New method for purifying recombinant proteins

SAYENS



18 Décembre 2018

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Fields

Biology / Medical

Sectors

Health

CONTEXT 

Recombinant protein production processes are actually a key focus of the bio-industry. Despite this, the purification of these proteins is still awaiting improvements because this step represents a very expensive cost of production for a low specificity.

DESCRIPTION

This invention concerns a new protein tag to be linked to a recombinant protein of interest in order to purify it by affinity chromatography. This system allows a one-step column purification with a much higher purity rate and a similar yield to conventional methods. In addition, elution is carried out with inexpensive and non-toxic lactose.
The effectiveness of the new tag has been validated in different prokaryotic-type protein production systems (E. coli) and is currently being studied in eukaryotic systems (HEK-type mammalian cells particularly).
Examples of proteins produced by this method (Kriznik et al. Biotechnology Journal 2018): an enzyme (thioredoxin Trx1), a transcription factor (ESRα), a receptor (TREM1) usually produced in an insoluble manner (solubility obtainment: Carasco et al. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 2018)...

COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES 

  • Efficient purification of all types of proteins (all origins and all weights): possible production in the prokaryotic system and soon eukaryotic
  • It helps to solubilize proteins of interest usually insoluble
  • Highly specific method (low contaminant content), higher purity rate
  • Use of a tag easily cleavable and separable from the protein of interest
  • One-step, low-cost purification (lactose elution)
  • No risk for the user
  • Near-zero environmental impact predicted (no toxic compounds)

MARKETS & APPLICATIONS 
Biotechnology: purification / detection of recombinant proteins

DEVELOPMENT STAGE
Technology validated in prokaryotic system and under development in eukaryotic system

RESEARCH TEAM 

Laboratory "Ingénierie Moléculaire & Physiopathologie Articulaire" (IMoPA) University of Lorraine - CNRS

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 
Patent registered on May 13th, 2016 (PCT/FR2017/051140)

TARGET PARTNERSHIP

Patent licensing

CONTACT 

Daniel KIRCHHERR
Business Development Manager
+33 (0)7 76 16 66 90
daniel.kirchherr@sayens.fr

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